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To Contribute to Cultural Inheritance, Fuji Xerox Reproduces Toyo Bunko's Picture Scroll of Japanese-Russian Friendship Using Its Advanced Technologies

Prime Minister Abe Presents the Reproduced Scroll to Russian President Putin

TOKYO, December 16, 2016 - As part of its efforts to contribute to cultural inheritance, Fuji Xerox Co., Ltd. reproduced "Hedaura-ni-okeru Rokoku Gunkan Kenzo Zukan" Note 1, a picture scroll depicting Japanese people helping Russians to build a ship to return to Russia, which is housed in the Toyo Bunko (The Oriental Library) in Tokyo. The presentation ceremony of a replica of the scroll took place at the Library today. Another replica of the scroll was selected as one of the gifts by Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe to President Vladimir Putin of Russian Federation, and presented on December 15 during the President's visit in Japan.

Replica of "Hedaura-ni-okeru Rokoku Gunkan Kenzo Zukan"

Generally speaking, the originals of historical documents are exhibited only for a limited time for fear of deterioration, and it is normally prohibited to touch them. However, replicas do not require such concern or restriction, allowing owners to exhibit them as long as necessary, and visitors can even touch them and feel their texture, thereby they contribute to cultural inheritance.

"Hedaura-ni-okeru Rokoku Gunkan Kenzo Zukan" has its own color tones and gloss typical to old historical documents, as well as unique texture that has been acquired over the years. Advanced technologies are required to accurately reproduce such delicate colors on Washi-traditional Japanese paper. Fuji Xerox utilized proprietary color management technologies to deliver the colors and tones that are faithful to the original, after digitalizing the original's image information and converting it into color data suitable for printing. For printing, Fuji Xerox used its high-image-quality, full-color multifunction device DocuColor 1450 GA, developed for the graphics arts market, customizing it to fuse the toner onto the Washi, which has a rougher surface and different moisture level than normal paper.

Fuji Xerox has been promoting cultural inheritance through the reproduction of historical documents since 2008 as part of its social contributions. Reproduction is undertaken by two project offices in Japan-one in Kyoto and the other in the company's major research and development center, Fuji Xerox R&D Square in Yokohama-and to date, the company has presented more than 200 replicas to shrines and temples, municipalities, universities, companies, and others.

In its Mission Statements, Fuji Xerox commits itself to "Contribute to the advancement of the global community by continuously fostering mutual trust and enriching diverse cultures." Leveraging its advanced reproduction technologies, Fuji Xerox continues such activities and considers related solutions that are aligned with its contributions to regional revitalization and activation.